"Cherry" Sitting Float

$0.00 - $170.00

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Color Pattern (details below) *


  


Photo shows colors in the "swirled" pattern.

The Cherry mix always contains the most vibrant transparent and opaque versions of Red that Bob can find - reds that are truly reminiscent of the cherries back in Door County (in Wisconsin) during the autumn. 

A deep, rich red, often referred to as a "Lipstick Red", is apparently extremely difficult to manufacture, particularly in the opaque version.  More often than not, it's either a little too orange or a little too brown, or a little too variable.  Bob strives to use the best Reds available, though.

Hand-made by glass artist Bob Meyer of Seal Rock, OR

 

Example Photos






Float Color Patterns: "Swirled"

The "swirled" pattern is acheived by making small swirls or twists in the glass with a hand tool like the shears.  It creates a nicely random movement of the colors.  Multiple examples are shown below to illustrate not only the effect, but also how varied it can be.






Float Color Patterns: "Swirled after Spiraled"

The "swirled after spiraled" pattern, then, is acheived by twisting the entire piece of glass on the pipe to create a spiral through it's entire length.  Once accomplished, small spirals are made with the shears, resulting in a random movement of lines of color.  Multiple examples are shown below to illustrate not only the effect, but also how varied it can be.






Float Color Patterns: "Optic Mold"

The "optic mold" pattern is acheived by placing the glass briefly into a cast-aluminum, finned "optic mold".  The use of the mold typically results in darker lines of color running through the piece, as well as some varied movement of the color between those lines.  Multiple examples are shown below to illustrate not only the effect, but also how varied it can be.






Float Color Patterns: "Optic Mold after Spiraled"

The "optic mold after spiraled" pattern, then, is acheived by twisting the entire piece of glass on the pipe to create a spiral through it's entire length.  Once accomplished, the glass is placed into the optic mold, creating a repeating, symmetrical, scalloped sort of movement in the colors.  Multiple examples are shown below to illustrate not only the effect, but also how varied it can be.






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DETAILS

Ocean Beaches Glassblowing & Gallery is owned and operated by Bob and Vicki Meyer.  Bob is the primary artist of the gallery.